More sleep is better for children of all ages2019-02-25T21:21:22+00:00

Project Description

More sleep is better for children of all ages

Deep sleep releases growth hormones in children and young adults. Many of the body’s cells also show increased production and reduced breakdown of proteins during deep sleep. Since proteins are the building blocks needed for cell growth and for repair of damage from factors like stress and ultraviolet rays, deep sleep is essential. During sleep, areas of your brain power down to ensure optimal functioning is done while they are awake. Areas that control emotions, decision-making processes, and social interactions all need a break to rest and recover. A study in rats also showed that certain nerve-signaling patterns which the rats generated during the day were repeated during deep sleep. This pattern repetition may help encode memories and improve learning.

Dreaming and REM sleep

We typically spend more than 2 hours each night dreaming. And in 1953 we were able to describe REM in sleeping infants, that is when we began to carefully study sleep and dreaming. They soon realized that the strange, illogical experiences we call dreams almost always occur during REM sleep. While most mammals and birds show signs of REM sleep, reptiles and other cold-blooded animals do not. REM sleep begins with signals from an area at the base of the brain called the pons. These signals travel to a brain region called the thalamus, which relays them to the cerebral cortex – the outer layer of the brain that is responsible for learning, thinking, and organizing information. The pons also sends signals that shut off neurons in the spinal cord, causing temporary paralysis of the limb muscles. If something interferes with this paralysis, people will begin to physically “act out” their dreams – a rare, dangerous problem called REM sleep behavior disorder. A person dreaming about a ball game, for example, may run headlong into furniture or blindly strike someone sleeping nearby while trying to catch a ball in the dream.

Areas in the brain associated with learning are stimulated while in REM sleep. Explaining why this occurrence is important for normal brain development during infancy, which would explain why infants spend much more time in REM sleep than adults. Like deep sleep, REM sleep is associated with increased production of proteins. One study found that REM sleep affects the learning of certain mental skills. People taught a skill and then deprived of non-REM sleep could recall what they had learned after sleeping, while people deprived of REM sleep could not.

What do my dreams mean?

Some believe dreams are the cortex’s attempt to find meaning in the random signals that it receives during REM sleep. The cortex is the part of the brain that interprets and organizes information from the environment during consciousness. It may be that, given random signals from the pons during REM sleep, the cortex tries to interpret these signals as well, creating a “story” out of fragmented brain activity.

We’re your Bed Buddy!!

Our mission is a simple one: We want to help you get incredible sleep, like a good sleep buddy should. And how you might ask? By not only conducting extensive research into the subject itself, but by personally testing out the thousands of mattresses on the market that claim to improve the quality of your slumber.

We really sleep on our mattress research by testing each for at least a hundred sleeps! We do not just compare features like review blogs, nor collate others’ online reviews, nor do a brief test of one to seven nights. No, our research includes a one hundred consecutive sleep test, so we can say, ‘Yup, this is what we found, because we really slept on it!’

We have no affiliation with the companies we feature, and any advertisements that appear on this website not at our discretion. They are there to keep the slumber party going. The Bed Buddy team takes incredible pride in the work we do. We hope that the reviews, news, and sleep information can help you on your personal journey for better sleep. And the job is fun – it’s not all naps! … sometimes… We love creating content that you enjoy, whether it’s on our site, or our newsletter, which you should sign up for.